Happy New Year from Chilly Mallorca

How were your New Year’s Eve celebrations? I don’t think anyone was sorry to see the end of 2020 but, wherever you were, I hope you had a chance to reflect on any positive aspects of what was a really crap year for everyone.

Part of the traditional nativity display in Palma’s El Corte Ingles department store

Like so many around the world, we’ve lost people this year who were dear to us. My extended family said goodbye to two much-loved senior members, and two friends were lost to cancer.

I begin each year by making a list of highlights of the previous 12 months: fiestas attended, restaurants enjoyed, new experiences, friends and family who’ve visited, etc. I’m always surprised at how much has happened and been achieved, and this strengthens my sense of gratitude.

Will I make a list for 2020? It’d be short. But even amidst the gloom and bad news of the pandemic year, I have found things for which to be grateful.

Reasons to be Positive

In the spring, the eldest of my two brothers was diagnosed with prostate cancer – even before he had any symptoms. He’d been to his GP about an unrelated problem and, while there, the doctor suggested an overdue PSA test. Long story short, my brother had a major operation – at a time when some hospitals had postponed most non-Covid-related procedures. I thank the NHS that he made a good recovery, without needing further treatment. If you’re male, please take this as a reminder to ask your doctor for a PSA test if you haven’t had one for a while.

I finished writing the first draft of my debut novel. This was back in spring, and I put the manuscript aside for a few months, as is recommended, before I started editing and revising. In 2021 I intend to see it published by whatever means possible. Just the small matter of finishing the revisions first.

We found a new Internet provider (ConectaBalear) – albeit too late to enjoy all the exciting online activities available during the strict three-month Spanish lockdown. As a result, we had a Christmas Day Zoom with my dad (whom I haven’t seen since a family funeral in the UK just before lockdown), and my two brothers and their families.

I also launched two podcasts, after my Mallorca Sunshine Radio show was put on hold. The weekly show was all about hospitality and gastronomy, and we all know what’s happened to those sectors – particularly in places depending on tourism. Living in Rural Mallorca podcast is about other expats’ experiences of life in the countryside here; Authors in Mallorca speaks for itself, I think. I hope you’ll have a listen and even subscribe to future episodes.

Kate Brittan – Australian Expat, Foodie, and Fledgling Farmer Living in Rural Mallorca

This episode’s guest, with her veterinarian husband, and their young son took a sabbatical from their life in Sydney to discover Europe. They planned to experience living in a city, the countryside, and Provence (France). After some months in Aix-en-Provence, they headed to the south of Spain for some warmth, basing themselves in Seville. Next stop on the Brittan family’s European sabbatical was Mallorca – an island they’d never visited before.After renting a rural property for a while, they realised they’d fallen in love with the largest of the Balearic Islands. In September 2019 they bought a beautiful mountain finca with twenty acres of land where they’ve created a family lifestyle that’s very different from their former lifestyle Down Under.Kate Brittan is a passionate foodie who originally trained in Australia as a chef before entering the corporate tech world. Since moving to the largest of the Balearic Islands, she’s started the popular Facebook group ‘The Mallorca Foodies’. Kate talks about the impact of Covid and the Australian wildfires on their family life, their impressive plans for the farm, solving the problem of sourcing favourite ingredients for cooking, the surprising way she integrated with her Mallorcan neighbours, and why she loves her nearest town, Inca. And, of course, she shares her top tips for anyone wanting to move to Mallorca.Follow Kate on Instagram: @fincalicious & @themallorcafoodiesFacebook group: The Mallorca FoodiesWatch Kate’s interview on the Our Tribe Travels community:https://l.facebook.com/l.php?u=https%3A%2F%2Fm.youtube.com%2Fwatch%3Fv%3Dn9SQ7o-fPeI PODCAST THEME TITLE: “Lifestyles”COMPOSER: Jack WaldenmaierPUBLISHER: Music Bakery Publishing (BMI)
  1. Kate Brittan – Australian Expat, Foodie, and Fledgling Farmer
  2. Annie Verrinder – Wedding Planner, Celebrant … and More
  3. Marc Rieke – Wigmaker, Equestrian, Saddle Fitter
  4. Caroline Fuller – Gardening in Mallorca
  5. Ep 4 Karl & Vikki Grant – Creative Photographers

Bella Younger – Comedian, Scriptwriter, Journalist, Memoirist Authors in Mallorca

Have you ever scrolled with a touch of envy through Instagram, seeing influencers flaunting fabulous freebies and their aspirational lifestyles? The reality of an influencer’s life is not always as it may seem, as my guest in this episode knows too well.  In 2015, when comedian and writer Bella Younger created her alter ego Deliciously Stella – parodying clean-eating Instagram influencers – she had no idea it would lead to 150,000 followers … and a spell in The Priory clinic. Bella performed sell-out stand-up shows at the Edinburgh Fringe, authored the spoof ‘Deliciously Stella’ cookbook, and was twice named one of the Evening Standard’s most influential Londoners. Today she lives a very different life in rural Mallorca, where she finished writing her second book last year. Her mental-health memoir is very funny but is also essential reading for anyone who thinks they (or a family member) may be spending a little too much time on Instagram. ‘The Accidental Influencer: How My Need to Get Likes Nearly Ruined My Life’ was published by Harper Collins on May 13th.Hear Bella talking about her unusual route into the BBC, her process for her current fictional work in progress, finding peace and inspiration in Mallorca for her writing, snail racing … and more.   ‘The Accidental Influencer: How My Need to Get Likes Nearly Ruined My Life’ is available now in bookshops and from Amazon, in Kindle and hardback formats. It's also available on Audible, narrated by Bella.  Instagram @deliciouslystellaTwitter @bellayoungerPODCAST THEME TITLE: “Lifestyles”COMPOSER: Jack WaldenmaierPUBLISHER: Music Bakery Publishing (BMI)Authors in Mallorca is taking a short break; season two will be along soon.
  1. Bella Younger – Comedian, Scriptwriter, Journalist, Memoirist
  2. Josie Lloyd – Novelist (Also Writes as Joanna Rees)
  3. Louise Davis – Memoirist
  4. Pete Davies – Debut Novelist (Crime Thriller)
  5. Dr James Rieley – Multi-Genre Author

Ooh, the Lucky Grapes!

New Year’s Eve in 2020 was low key in our house. TV reception was almost non-existent because of bad weather, so we read. The Boss opened a bottle of cava to toast in the New Year, but we almost forgot about the ‘lucky grapes’. This Spanish tradition, dating back to the early 20th century, calls for one grape to be eaten with each of the twelve clock chimes at midnight. It’s harder than it sounds and seedless grapes are recommended (as is peeling them in advance; note to self for next time).

I rushed to the fridge to fetch the two portions of grapes and, although we started a few seconds late, we managed to swallow them all before 2021 arrived.

The lucky part was that we didn’t choke trying to do so! Gotta find the positives where you can…

Have a Happy and Healthy New Year. Be safe.

Jan Edwards Copyright 2021

Karl & Vikki Grant – Photographers

One of the many reasons we love living on the Spanish island of Mallorca is that it’s a melting pot of nationalities and cultures. It’s also home to many interesting people, with fascinating back stories.

I lap up these stories, although they sometimes make me feel as though my own life has been a little tame. I haven’t trekked across a desert, toured the world with a top band, or written a series of books, as some of my friends and acquaintances have. Hey, there’s still time though. (The Boss has a worried look on his face).

We’ve been fortunate enough to become friends with some of the people I’ve met through writing and broadcasting and one such couple features on the latest episode of my ‘Living in Rural Mallorca’ podcast.

Vikki and Karl at home, with two of their animals

Karl and Vikki Grant are talented commercial photographers who live in the Mallorcan countryside, where their finca is also the surprising home to a stylish photographic studio, also used for location shoots.

Their business Studio Mallorca offers creative photography, video, and website design. Their photography work includes fashion, food, nautical, property, and portraiture. Among those who have sat for them are Mick Jagger, John Cleese and, recently, Jeffrey Archer – who has a writing room overlooking the Mediterranean (I’m only a little envious) at his second home in Mallorca.

In episode 4 of the ‘Living in Rural Mallorca’ podcast, hear Vikki and Karl talk about their move to Mallorca, the surprises they found here, and the menagerie that’s almost de rigeur when living in the Mallorcan countryside. And if you enjoy listening, I’d be thrilled if you’d subscribe.

The ‘Living in Rural Mallorca’ podcast is also available on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, and other podcast apps.

The theme music for the Living in Rural Mallorca podcast is titled ‘Lifestyles’. Composer: Jack Waldenmaier. Publisher: Music Bakery Publishing (BMI). All copyrights, licensing, duplication, and distribution rights for this music are held exclusively by Music Bakery Publishing (BMI).

Jan Edwards Copyright 2020

Winter Drawers On in Mallorca!

We’ve had an amazing autumn this year in Mallorca. It’s sad that people who would usually enjoy a late-autumn break on the island weren’t here to enjoy the blue skies and pleasant temperatures we’ve recently had.

Our winter warmer

I’ve even eaten quite a few breakfasts sitting on the terrace, soaking up some early rays. The Boss tends to watch the UK news on TV at breakfast time and, with everything that’s going on in at the moment, that would probably give me indigestion.

Yesterday was the first day of winter – in meteorological terms. I prefer to think of winter starting on the astronomical Winter Solstice date of December 21st. Anything to delay the start of my least favourite season here in Mallorca – despite the allure of the log-burner, hearty casseroles, red wine, and Christmas.

And So it Begins

Whichever date you consider as kicking off the winter, the weather has decided it begins today. With a bang. Or, at least, a dollop of the white stuff.

Snow has already fallen today in the Serra de Tramuntana mountains – which isn’t too unusual for this time of year. For those of us living under 1,100 metres above sea level, it’s a grey, wet day with top temperatures barely in double figures and expected to fall to between three and six degrees Celsius later today. Oh, and did I mention the winds gusting up to 70kph in the northeast of Mallorca? Needless to say, breakfast was indoors this morning.

‘Tis the Season to be Supplementing

Commenting on the results of my recent blood test yesterday, my gynaecologist said my Vitamin D level was a bit low. I was surprised and explained that I’d been sitting outside having my breakfast on sunny mornings, with a view to increasing it.

‘Do you do it naked?’ he asked.

‘Er, no.’ I replied. ‘It’d probably frighten the sheep.’ For the record, the doctor wasn’t being pervy, but making the point that I needed to expose more flesh for longer to get sufficient benefit from an autumn morning’s sunshine.

‘Has she finished eating breakfast yet?’

I probably could breakfast outdoors in my birthday suit, as the neighbours would be unlikely to see me. But, hey, it’s winter now and far too cold. And besides, if I eat outdoors, our attention-loving ginger cat Shorty likes to leap onto my lap as soon as I’ve finished eating. Imagine the pain of those claws landing…

Welcome, then, to winter in Mallorca. And a daily dose of Vitamin D supplement.

If it’s cold where you are and you fancy curling up and listening to a podcast, I’d love you to check out Living in Rural Mallorca and Authors in Mallorca. You’ll find both available on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, and a few other players too.

Jan Edwards Copyright 2020

Damian Wilson, Digital Creator

Englishman and countryside lover, Damian Wilson, lives with his small menagerie of rescue animals in the rural heart of Mallorca.

He spent many years in the music business, and worked with artists including The Human League and Ace of Base; Damian was the A&R (artists and repertoire) executive for the latter’s Danish record company.

But Damian’s heart is in Mallorca and he talks about rural life, animals, and how he used his creativity at home during Spain’s tough spring 2020 lockdown. You’ll also hear about his production company Film Balear.

Episode 3 – Damian Wilson

The theme music for the Living in Rural Mallorca podcast is titled ‘Lifestyles’. Composer: Jack Waldenmaier. Publisher: Music Bakery Publishing (BMI). All copyrights, licensing, duplication, and distribution rights for this music are held exclusively by Music Bakery Publishing (BMI).

Manacor Still in Lockdown

It’s the news that people in and around the town of Manacor were dreading: a two-week extension begins today to the fortnight’s lockdown imposed a couple of weeks ago, to reduce the number of Covid-19 cases. The Balearic government has also brought forward the curfew time from midnight to 10pm.

Eat Outside or Takeaway

We feel particularly sorry for the restaurants, cafes, and bars, who are unable to serve people indoors during this period. Despite the lovely weather we’ve been having during the day, the cool evenings may not be conducive to dining on a terrace. The food would soon be cold (plates are rarely warmed first here in Mallorca), even if diners themselves were dressed to keep warm. A number of places are offering takeaway food and, for some in Manacor, this is the preferred alternative.

Hey, Mr Postman

Our list of things-to-do when Manacor re-opens is growing by the day. First will be a visit to Correos (the post office), where we have our apartado (postbox); no postie makes his way to our rural neck of the woods. We imagine our little mailbox will be stuffed with letters, bills, magazines we subscribe to, and cards sent for my birthday – which happened after Manacor’s lockdown started. My thank you notes for cards received will be somewhat delayed this year!

A main concern is whether our UK bank will have written to tell us we can no longer have an account with them after the end of this year, when Brexit is finalised. Several UK banks have already informed British customers living in Europe that this is happening. Our bank has not yet made any announcement or informed us of a decision and we hope they haven’t done this by post, as it’ll be a fortnight before we get our hands on our mail. And Brexit looms…

Meanwhile we’ve found solutions to being barred from going into Manacor: we’ve eaten lunch in Porto Cristo and done our food shopping (and a local bank visit to pay a bill) in Can Picafort. Both excursions gave us a chance to enjoy being by the sea in the continuing good November weather.

But we’re looking forward to returning to Manacor and supporting the local businesses there.

Authors in Mallorca Podcast

During our time here, I’ve discovered there are many interesting foreigners in Mallorca who write books – of all types and genres. Why not talk to some of them and find out about their writing life and their works? Hence, the launch of my second podcast, Authors in Mallorca.

For the first episode I met up with British author Anna Nicholas, whose books about moving from a busy life in public relations in Mayfair to a rural home in Sóller have many fans around the world. I’ve interviewed Anna on radio before and she’s an entertaining guest.

If you’d like to listen, Authors in Mallorca is available now on Spotify and on Apple Podcasts. I hope you’ll enjoy it.

Jan Edwards Copyright 2020

Florist Joanna Walton

In England, Joanna Walton used to own a number of London flower shops. These days, home is a tucked-away country property, near the town of Artà, shared with her husband Anthony – who has a construction company on the island – and some much-loved dogs and cats.

Her Mallorca business, Joanna Walton Flowers, supplies floral arrangements and decorations for weddings and other celebrations, superyachts, and luxury villas.

Joanna talks about the changes she’s noticed in Mallorca since her first summer on the island some thirty years ago; the challenges of life here, and shares a tip for using those fallen pine cones often found in the Mallorcan countryside.

Find out more about Joanna Walton Flowers here.

The theme music for the Living in Rural Mallorca podcast is titled ‘Lifestyles’. Composer: Jack Waldenmaier. Publisher: Music Bakery Publishing (BMI). All copyrights, licensing, duplication, and distribution rights for this music are held exclusively by Music Bakery Publishing (BMI).

Curfew & Curtailment in Mallorca

Thank heavens for the period of fine weather we’re enjoying in Mallorca now. It’s known as the veranillo de las rosas otoñales. This ‘little summer of autumn roses’ – I love the name – is the equivalent of what’s called an ‘Indian summer’ in English.

My David Austin climbing rose – blooming in late October

Spain being a Catholic country, you won’t be surprised to read that these periods of lovely weather are said to be bordered by saints’ days: September 29th (Saints Michael, Gabriel, and Raphael) and November 11th (St Martin). Fingers crossed then that we have another couple of weeks in which to enjoy the type of weather that can be a distraction from all-things Covid.

Curfew Everywhere in Spain

The pandemic in Spain rages mainly everywhere. So much so that a national curfew was introduced from last Sunday. The curfew period was set by the Spanish government from 11pm until 6am, with regional governments allowed to tinker with these times if they saw fit.

If you’re someone who likes to be tucked up in bed by eleven, and doesn’t contemplate stepping outside again until it’s at least daylight, this curfew is unlikely to have much impact on your daily life. But, for many Spaniards – particularly those in big cities – eleven at night is when they may not long have gone out to socialise or eat dinner.

Not Good for Night Owls

The first time The Boss and I visited Barcelona (probably twenty-plus years ago), we couldn’t find a restaurant open until nine in the evening. By the time we’d finished dinner – in an otherwise empty restaurant – locals were just arriving there to start their meal.

On another occasion, I was the anchorperson on a video that the hotel group I worked for was shooting in Madrid. I was supposed to do a piece to camera outside the hotel after dark but the noise of traffic was so loud that we delayed the shoot until after a late dinner. We eventually filmed the link at two in the morning and, even at that hour, cars were still whizzing past as we filmed.

Under pressure from Mallorca’s restaurants and bars, the curfew on the island has been amended and is now from midnight until six in the morning, with the threat that the start time will revert to eleven if Covid-19 cases continue to rise.

Manacor in Lockdown

Manacor is our nearest town and it’s where we buy anything we need, recycle our rubbish, fill the car with diesel, etc. Yesterday Manacor was locked down for fifteen days.

Manacor is currently the area with the highest ratio of cases to local population in the Balearics, and it’s hoped that this latest measure will help reduce contagion.

It’s not the same as the national lockdown in spring. Businesses and schools remain open in the town and those who live within the set perimeters can go about their daily lives (including work) – although it’s recommended not to go out more than necessary.

Worst hit by this two-week lockdown are Manacor’s restaurants and bars. They can only serve customers on terraces (and with a maximum of 50 per cent of their normal capacity) and not indoors, and must close by 10pm. They are allowed to offer a take-away service; for restaurants such as the renowned Can March, which has no outdoor space, take-away is the only option.

Anyone who lives outside the borders of the locked-down area – which includes us – must stay away. Our heavy winter curtains will remain, for now, at the dry cleaners – another reason to hope this ‘little summer of autumn roses’ continues – and we shall have to wait to collect the picture to be framed that we took to a little business in Manacor.

Next Episode of Podcast Soon!

I had the most enjoyable of mornings yesterday talking to my next guest on the Living in Rural Mallorca podcast. You’ll be able to hear her soon. We sat outdoors to record the conversation, enjoying the natural beauty of the northeast corner of Mallorca. On the way home, I spotted these beautiful bucolic scenes.

Until next time, stay safe wherever you are, and give thanks for whatever’s good in your life.

Jan Edwards – Copyright – 2020

Storm Strikes Again at our Finca

Autumn arrived with a bang this year. Quite a few bangs, actually. Although this time of the year is when we expect thunderstorms, there seem to have been more than usual recently. Why should I expect something ‘normal’ in a year like 2020?

August 29th was the first big storm that sticks in our mind; this is probably because we’ve only just received and paid the eye-popping bill for the repair of the lightning-damaged inverter that keeps our solar-power electricity system going.

The latest storm a couple of nights ago appears to have affected our generator. It simply won’t start. This hulking (and noisy) beast usually kicks in automatically when the solar batteries are a little low in power – which happens when the sun hasn’t been on duty for a while or we use certain power-guzzling appliances.

Our recent top-up delivery of diesel for the generator.

Today we have sunshine, which means the solar panels are maxing out on sunbathing and our system can happily run without the generator – assuming modest use of power. But using the washing machine or the iron, for example, kicks off the generator however much sun is available.

Rugs at the Ready

Until the generator can be fixed, doing the laundry at home is off limits. Oh, and so are the air-conditioning units that do heating duty in the evenings at this time of year – when it’s not quite cold enough for a log fire (The Boss would disagree with that) but a little warmth is appreciated. It’s a cosy rug over the legs on the sofa for us for the foreseeable.

The big positive about all the rain we’ve had is that rural Mallorca has lost the veil of dust it’s been wearing over the dry months. Everything looks sparkling clean . . . except the contents of the laundry basket.

The stream at the bottom of our valley should be full of water by now, but I won’t have to resort to kneeling on its muddy banks to do the laundry. Thank heavens for gas-powered water heaters and a good-sized kitchen sink. Now, pass the Marigolds . . .

Jan Edwards Copyright 2020

Norbert Amthor of Finca Hotel Can Estades

Norbert Amthor is originally from Germany and lives and works on a beautiful finca in the southwest of Mallorca. He and his wife Christiane are the welcoming hosts of the rural Finca Hotel Can Estades, located in the countryside near the village of Calvià.

Norbert talks about the challenges of the first finca he bought on the island, explains how he came to be running a rural hotel, and has some advice for anyone wanting to move to Mallorca. You’ll also hear him reveal how he met his wife, what they enjoy about the island’s capital, Palma de Mallorca, and the pastime he loves that he took up only at the age of 59.

Find out more about Norbert and Christiane’s B&B hotel here.

The theme music for the Living in Rural Mallorca podcast is titled ‘Lifestyles’. Composer: Jack Waldenmaier. Publisher: Music Bakery Publishing (BMI). All copyrights, licensing, duplication, and distribution rights for this music are held exclusively by Music Bakery Publishing (BMI).

Living in Rural Mallorca Podcast – Next!

October already! It’s when we start to think about taking long walks again – the heat of summer being over. It’s also the month I’m finally launching my Living in Rural Mallorca podcast, in which you can hear the experiences of other expats who have chosen to live in the Mallorcan countryside, as we have.

Mallorca woods walk
Walking season has arrived

I planned to start this podcast early in 2020. Then a couple of things happened: my beautiful Auntie Joan passed away and I returned to the UK for her funeral; then, just a few days after my return, Spain went into lockdown.

Thwarted by Weak WiFi

Several famous people started podcasts during the lockdown, using online facilities such as Zoom and Skype to record remote guests. Sadly, our WiFi was too feeble and we couldn’t even watch Netflix, YouTube, or join online family meet-ups on Houseparty.

But I was otherwise ready, having bought myself a new digital recorder (Zoom H2n, if you’re interested), sourced some theme music, and created my podcast label. The final piece in the podcast puzzle was finding a new Internet service, which has made many more online things possible for us. Oh, and a first guest.

Expat Interviews

My plan is to invite expats to join me on future episodes of this podcast to share their experiences of living in the Mallorcan countryside. These guests won’t be only from the UK, as my Living in Rural Mallorca blog has readers and followers from all around the world.

In my next post, you can hear the first episode of the Living in Rural Mallorca podcast. I hope you’ll enjoy hearing about the experiences of Norbert Amthor, who lives and works in the southwest of Mallorca.