Poppies popping up – but not on our finca

Rural Majorcan poppies

A blaze of colour, although the farmer probably didn’t appreciate the invasion of his cereal crop!

Poppies seem to have been late emerging this spring on Mallorca. Perhaps it was because of the huge amount of rain that fell on the island over the winter months?

I love poppies and was keen to plant some in the garden, imagining a future scene reminiscent of Claude Monet’s famous Poppy Field. A welcome gift of California poppy seeds was liberally sewn over the small patch of our garden that has more than an inch or two of soil.

Lost to the lane

Last year a few of these seeds did grow into poppies but, this year, we haven’t had a single one in the garden. However, the wildflower-strewn verges of our lane have become home to a few that are more West-Coast America than rural Mallorca. Ho hum. Well, this is a breezy island…

A touch of Monet on Mallorca?

Elsewhere in rural Mallorca poppies are having a field day (pardon the pun). On our way back from an appointment in the town of Sa Pobla yesterday we spotted a particularly colourful field. I didn’t have my camera with me, so the image is courtesy of my iPad. And there are quite a few similar displays of poppies elsewhere on Mallorca…just not in our garden.

Text and photo Jan Edwards©2017

A gap in the garden

Something was missing when we looked out at the garden yesterday although, strictly speaking, not missing at all as it is still very much present …

In January this year we noticed that one of our huge sword plants had sprouted a stalk that looked like a giant piece of asparagus. It quickly grew taller and we knew that this was the beginning of the plant’s death knell. It would produce flowers, then eventually die. We had no idea of timescale but hoped it would survive so that our visitors in the spring could see it.

Sky-bound

Sky-bound

It survived until yesterday, nine months later, and all of our visitors this year were able to see what looked like a freaky type of tree. We’d been wondering how much longer it would last, as it still looked pretty green and healthy. The flowers it had sprouted up on high were a magnet for the local bees and, after the flowers had died, small green things replaced them. These baby swords would drop to the ground regularly and we’ve been scooping them up to avoid our garden eventually turning into a spiky no-go zone.

For most of its nine months, The Spike had had a tendency to lean, and we’d already worked out more or less where it would land if it fell over before we could remove it. When it crashed to the ground some time yesterday (we missed the event itself), our predictions turned out to be accurate.

The End

The End

Now we just have to dispose of the ‘trunk’ (which we’re told secretes an irritating fluid you don’t want to get on your skin) and pick up the thousands of baby sword plants from the garden path. Then decide what to do about the new gap in our garden greenery.

 

 

 

 

Spring has sprung on Mallorca

A recent writing project has left me feeling a bit ‘written-out’. I’ve scribed around 12,000 words in the past few weeks on this one project – in addition to other articles, and posts on http://www.eatdrinksleepmallorca.com. No wonder my computer screen has been gazing blankly back at me when I’ve sat down to write about our life in rural Mallorca. It was as tired as I was; my keyboard and I needed a little time apart.

So, as it’s spring, I grabbed my camera and headed into our garden and field, to take a few photos of the mix of cultivated and uncultivated delights that remind me why it pays to get off my writer’s bottom (well spread) and get out into Mallorca’s great outdoors.

I hope that, wherever you are, spring is making itself known to you too.

The view from the roof of our water tank ... not somewhere I venture up to very often!

The view from the roof of our water tank … not somewhere I venture up to very often!

DSC_9084

DSC_9086

DSC_9087

DSC_9089

DSC_9094

DSC_9020

First ever blossoms on our blackthorn bushes - brought over from the UK by good friends. Sloe gin? Maybe in a few years' time ...

First-ever blossoms on our blackthorn bushes – brought over from the UK by good friends. Sloe gin? Maybe in a few years’ time …

 

 

Looks like the beanstalk – but where’s Jack?

In the early days of setting up a garden in the field of our finca home in rural Mallorca, we had no idea quite how large everything would grow. It seems that the lack of soil depth on our rocky land has been no deterrent to growth: aloes, agaves, ‘swords’ (I have no idea of their official name), and yuccas, have all grown to sizes beyond our expectations.

I used to wonder when our garden would be considered ‘mature’. Well, I think it’s now: one of our ‘sword’ plants has sprouted something akin to the beanstalk of the famous fairytale, and resembling a giant stalk of asparagus. If only. Think of the culinary treats . . .

Sky-bound

Sky-bound

We know that the stalk will eventually throw out a flower and, once that has died, it’s goodbye plant. Although it’s quite exciting to see this thing grow (and it’s making fairly rapid progress out there), this mighty plant, having flowered, will wither and keel over. We’ve checked its future trajectory and our roof seems to be in no danger, but The Boss will have quite a job to dig the dead plant – and what are probably quite impressive roots – out of the ground. A decade ago it was a small and rather sickly thing when a kind neighbor gave it to us to help fill some of the yawning space that was crying out to be a Mediterranean garden.

No wonder it's called the sword plant . . .

No wonder it’s called the sword plant . . .

Although the evil spikes on the end of each sword-like leaf have punctured various bits of our bodies during gardening sessions (ouch!), we’ll still be sorry to lose such an impressive architectural plant.

 

 

 

Happy New Year from rural Mallorca

Christmas bauble

Our artificial Christmas tree spruced up for the festivities.

When we were planning to move to Mallorca we decided to buy a good-quality artificial Christmas tree in the UK for future use. We were pretty sure that finding a real Christmas tree for our rural Balearic island home would be as unlikely as winning El Gordo (‘the fat one’) – the hugely popular Spanish lottery draw that takes place each year on December 22nd.

We’ve still not won El Gordo (perhaps buying a ticket would help?), but only a few years passed before real Christmas trees started to appear for sale in garden centres and plant shops on Mallorca. They’re not as popular as they are in the UK – where we used to queue in the grounds of Blenheim Palace to choose and buy our tree. But, for the record – if you are planning to move to Mallorca (or spend Christmas in a holiday home here), you’re sure to find a real tree to decorate.

Without a real or artificial tree, all it takes is some imagination (and a bit of time) to come up with an alternative. Yesterday, in the hilltop town of Artà, we spotted a clever Christmas-tree-shaped decoration made from wooden coat hangers, decorated with bright baubles, in the window of a boutique.

But my favourite Christmas-tree-that’s-not-a-tree was this one – seen in a baker’s shop window in the same town. I give you . . . the ensaïmada tree.  The ensaïmada is the emblematic pastry of Mallorca – so what could be more appropriate?

Ensaimada Christmas tree

A tree with a difference!

My next post will be in 2016, so The Boss and I take this opportunity now to wish you a Happy New Year. Thank you for reading Living in Rural Mallorca during 2015!

 

 

October: a month of contrasts on Mallorca

A late afternoon bath for this robin.

A late-afternoon bath for this robin.

This coming weekend on Mallorca we shall be turning back the clocks, marking the official end of the summer. It’s been a long hot one and, although we are already two-thirds of the way through October, we are thankfully still having a few lovely warm days. When the sun shines, we open doors and windows during the day to let in the warm air. As things cool, we close everything up but, in the evenings, the living room of our home in rural Mallorca already feels a little chilly.  Oh, for cavity wall insulation . . . if there were a cavity to fill.

Winter drawers on? Not quite yet . . .

We’re at the time of year when the lightest of summer clothes (and certainly anything white) is consigned to storage bags and boxes under the beds. (Buy an old Mallorcan property and you’re unlikely to find many cupboards for storing stuff). But we’re not ready yet to shrug ourselves into sweaters and woolly socks during the day. My much-loved Menorcan sandals (highly recommended for comfort) and I won’t be prised apart until my feet lose all sensation because of the cold. I’ve even worn shorts in the past fortnight . . . but also seen locals wearing thick sweaters, scarves, and boots . . . in temperatures up to 25 degrees Celsius!

The house ‘wardrobe’ also changes. The light sheer curtains that blow gently in the breezes of the warmer months will be replaced by curtains with thermal linings. I’ve already retrieved one pair from storage, ironed them, and hung them. Another two pairs to go . . .

Winter/spring

October is a month of contrasts outdoors too, with signs of winter, but also of new beginnings. No wonder the Mallorcans call this season winter/spring. We have a garden with plenty of new growth (a lot of it weeds, I should add), but our family of ‘adopted’ cats is eating heartily as though preparing for a prolonged trip to Siberia. On Sunday evening, despite the diminishing daylight, it was warm enough to eat a BBQ dinner outside, for the first time in a few weeks. But a visitor earlier that afternoon reminded us that there may not be too many more alfresco dinners: on our birdbath – sprucing himself up after a long flight south – was that feathered emblem of winter, the robin.

The photo of the robin was taken from inside the house, and the close-up was achieved by cropping the image.

How about living in rural Mallorca?

We’ve met a lot of interesting people since we moved to rural Mallorca – and some of them also own fincas; it’s always good to talk to others who have a similar lifestyle to our own. One such person is a lovely lady called Kay Newton. Work, life, and the distance between our respective homes on Mallorca has meant that I haven’t seen nearly as much of Kay as I’d like to have done.

We met first at a lunch organised by a women’s networking group known as LACE. I joined this group fairly soon after moving here – not because I needed the advantages of networking with businesswomen, but because the only females living in my immediate vicinity were sheep, and I needed some girl talk! (I have, of course, since got to know the women who live in the valley).

Unfortunately for her many friends (she is a very popular, warm-hearted, and generous person), Kay and her husband are about to leave Mallorca for rather exciting reasons.  Their departure raises the possibility for someone to enjoy a new life – and potential business – in a finca on this beautiful Spanish island.

Here’s Kay to explain . . .

“I’m a personal development coach, author, and mum to two boys aged 18 and 21. Now we have an empty nest. My husband and I are currently undergoing a lifestyle change. After 30 years on Mallorca, and 20 years in the same house, we are about to move to a beach hut in Zanzibar! So our ‘dream life’ here in Spain is up for sale.”

So you are in effect going from an ’empty nest’ to ‘no nest’?

“At the beginning of this year I had no idea we would be having this conversation. This opportunity arose at Easter, and we felt we just couldn’t say no. The kids have left home, we have downsized and de-cluttered, and our lives now fit into two 20-kilo bags.”

What have your boys said?

“My eldest is following his passion in food and is currently a crew chef on board a private superyacht. My youngest is about to start three years at a UK university. The whole family enjoys adventures. It was a bit of a shock at first, yet I think they like the idea now.”

What do you love about Mallorca?

“I love the Mediterranean lifestyle and the weather of course. The Sunday Times recently voted it the world’s first choice as a destination to live. The close proximity to Europe makes it a wonderful holiday destination too. I love the fact that you can still find quiet beaches in August, and in the autumn and spring the mountain walks are spectacular. We have fabulous restaurants, great international schools, a large expat community – and, of course, living here at Can Jaume!”

Tell us about Can Jaume

“Can Jaume is situated in the centre of the island away from the tourist areas. It is in a rural setting yet has easy access to the city of Inca and the island in general. The 11,000sqm plot is all organic and the accommodation split in two. A fully restored farmhouse with four bedrooms, and the old milking shed is now a two-bedroom guest house. I am able to work from home as a personal development coach and Tai Chi instructor, and use the guest house for workshops and retreats when it is not rented out.”

So you are selling your dream?

“Yes, in effect, we are selling the dream lifestyle we lead here, not just a house. We have put together a package for the right person. Someone who wants to act quickly, get away from grey skies, perhaps, and someone who is excited about taking on a project with a proven track record. The package include the house, furniture, website, holiday listings, and coaching to help you through the setting up period. All you really need is to pack a suitcase!”

House for sale Inca

Living the dream at Can Jaume, near Inca, Mallorca. Photo courtesy of Kay.

More information can be found at:

http://www.NewtonProjectManagement.com

http://www.MallorcaLet.com

The Boss and I wish Kay and James every success in their new life. Now, read the press release about the latest book written jointly by Kay and Pat Duckworth, available on Amazon Kindle  . . .

Five Quick Fixes For Empty Nest Syndrome: What every parent needs to know

Now that the excitement around the A-Level results are over, job vacancies being filled and university places being sorted out, it’s time to think about whether you and your young person are ready for the next stage – independent living and the empty nest.

There may be no statistical evidence to prove that empty nest syndrome exists, yet those experiencing it will vouch that it is real, emotional and often overpowering. Today, when we are in pain, we look for a quick fix, a magical pill to cure our ills.

In reality, we know there is no such thing as a quick fix, yet there are simple steps you can put into place immediately. Local writer and therapist, Pat Duckworth, has co-written a short book with coach, Kay Newton to provide parents with strategies to help readers successfully navigate this stage of life.

“Empty Nest is a time of transition for the relationship between you and your child as they develop into an adult. That parent/child relationship may be ending, but a new adult relationship is just beginning,” says Pat

Here are five of their tips:

  1. Is everything prepared? Does your young adult have all the skills they need to live alone?

Have you begun to think what you will do with your spare time? Have you all discussed and agreed ground rules for visits home in the future?

2.  Let go

We learn better by making our own mistakes. Now is not the time for ‘helicopter parenting’, for doing everything for your young adult. Let them go it alone. Let them fall. They will learn to pick themselves up again, just as they did as toddlers.

3.  Talk about money

Money plays an important role at this stage, yet it is often ignored and not talked about. Do you know your financial situation? Have you let them know what financial help you can give, and for how long it will last?

4.  Have a ritual

We celebrate all other stages of our lives, yet often fail to celebrate midlife and the next step in our family dynamics. Plan a celebration that will mean something to you all at this defining point in your lives, helping you all to focus on the future.

5.  Seek professional help

If you still cannot cope with day-to-day tasks two weeks after your nest is empty, seek professional help.

https://quickfixfor.wordpress.com/

 

About the Authors:

Pat Duckworth

Cognitive hypnotherapist, author, speaker, workshop and retreat facilitator.

After a successful career in the Civil Service Pat took early retirement and re-trained as a cognitive hypnotherapist. Pat specialises in helping women find solutions to their menopause symptoms. As a professional and positive role- model Pat inspires 50+ women to make effective changes in their life, without necessarily using treatments that involve side-effects or contraindications.

Pat’s three books and work can be found at: http://www.HotWomenCoolSolutions.com

Kay Newton

Personal Development Coach, author, speaker, workshop, retreat and event facilitator,

Uniting and inspiring midlife women is Kay’s passion. For the past thirty years Kay has lived her dream life in Mallorca Spain. In September 2015 Kay is moving to Zanzibar Tanzania with her husband and a 20 kg suitcase, leaving both nest and adult children behind.

You can find Kay’s work at: http://www.SensiblySelfish.com