Season of Mellow Fruitfulness in Mallorca

Autumn arrived very suddenly this year on Mallorca. On the day the season officially changed, it was as though someone had flicked a switch and disconnected summer. It was off with the shorts and on with the jeans. We’re not really complaining because autumn has so far brought a decent amount of rainfall – something desperately needed on the island.

Within a few days of rain falling (at times, hammering down), our garden was re-invigorated: plants that had seemed on the verge of death perked up and sprouted new growth, autumn crocus popped up around the base of the birdbath, and flowers have bloomed again. What had recently been a parched rock-solid patch of garden is now lush with the dreaded heart-shaped weeds that return every year. After more than a decade of painstakingly digging them out individually, with a view to killing them off forever, I raise my hands in defeat, flying a white hanky on the handle of the garden trowel: “Enough!” The weeds are green. It’s the colour of a garden.

Not Quite Winter, Not Quite Spring

This time of year is called ‘winter-spring’ by the locals and there are clear similarities to the official springtime. New growth, plenty of lambs frolicking around in the fields, and chirpy birdsong surround us. The big difference is that winter, rather than the warmer summer months, is to follow. The Boss is already making preparations to ensure we’ll be warm and draught free indoors.

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The damp weather also brings mushrooms and toadstools. We find plenty on our land but, being nervous about identification of these various fungi, wouldn’t dream of eating any. But don’t they make great subjects for photos.

Jan Edwards Copyright 2016

It’s Spring Again!

It was a long hot summer on Mallorca … and now it’s spring again. And if you’re thinking I’ve been indulging in a little too much of Mallorca’s many excellent wines, I should explain: we’re now in what the locals call ‘winter spring’. And it is literally like a second spring.

During the hottest months of the summer little happens in the garden. Plants appear to go into a comatose state, as they struggle to survive without water, and only perk up again after the first storms of the autumn have given everything a long cool drink and a jolly good wash. After the first autumn storms – mercifully nowhere near as severe as those in southern Spain – everything in the garden looks perky and a brighter green. There’s new growth . . . sadly, most of it in the weed category.

And, today, October 1st, we were greeted by the sight of what I think are autumn crocus – but please correct me if I’m wrong – which were definitely not there a day or two ago.

There’s nothing like that to put a spring in your step on a Monday morning!

Good morning Mallorca

Jan Edwards Copyright 2012