Mallorca takes an autumn battering

It’s been very windy here in the northeast of Mallorca for a couple of days and, being a north wind, it’s felt pretty cold too. Our finca is particularly exposed, being at one end of a valley, and we brace ourselves for the inevitable arrival of these gusty autumn days as best we can. Most of our outdoor furniture is now put away in our annexe guest room (which becomes a storage space in winter, when anyone sleeping in there would surely expire from hypothermia).

Broken terracotta pot

New pot required

When we ventured outside yesterday morning to feed the cats (who become super-skittish when it’s windy), evidence of the gusty night was all around. (Have you noticed that the wind always blows hard the day after you’ve swept the terraces?). One of the casualties this time was a fairly large shrub I planted during the summer – in a decent-sized pot (weighted down with heavy stones under the soil).  The pot is no more.

It never fails to amaze me that the wind brings over large heavy pots, yet the lighter potted plants sitting along a small wall remain unaffected by the gusts. Ah, well, the mysteries of life in the Mallorcan countryside…

©Jan Edwards 2017

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How we remove condensation from our windows in Mallorca

The Boss’s eldest son was over for a couple of days at the weekend. The weather continued warm and sunny on Saturday and we took a long walk around Porto Colom harbour (one of Mallorca’s highlights) towards the lighthouse. We didn’t expect to find either of the two small beach bars along the route still open in early November but the first one we came to was doing a decent trade. A few people were on the beach or even in the sea. Who’d have believed it? We grabbed some beers and soaked up the sunshine for a while.

Chiringuito Porto Colom

Open for business – even in November

Beach scene, Porto Colom

On the beach – November 4th, 2017

Hello again, condensation

It all changed on Sunday, with heavy rain and cooler temperatures arriving during that day. Overnight temperatures have been a lot lower since and that means we find condensation running down the inside of all our thin-glass windows in the mornings. Just looking at them makes us feel colder…

Last year – tired of wiping away all the moisture with a cloth every morning – we bought a Kärcher window cleaner. It sucks the condensation away from all the windows and it’s job done in a matter of minutes. And it’s surprising how much water ends up in the built-in collection bottle. No more soggy cloths, thank goodness.

Like our wood-burning stove and dehumidifier, this nifty little hand-held gadget helps to make indoor life in an old stone Mallorcan house a little more comfortable during the cooler months.

Kaercher window cleaner

Condensation blitzed with this handy hand-held tool

Snow?

The first few days of November were unusually warm, but it’s back to normality now. I’ve just read in the Diario de Mallorca that some snow is forecast to fall tomorrow in parts of the Serra de Tramuntana mountains (at 1,300m above sea level). This isn’t unusual for November and that frosting on the top of the highest peaks is what usually reminds me I should be starting the process of making a Christmas cake!

Although the sun is shining as I write this and the temperature is 18 degrees C in the shade, the north and northeast of Mallorca has a warning for heavy rain this evening from six o’clock, with up to 20 litres per square metre forecast to fall in an hour. I think our outdoor cats will be having an early dinner tonight…

©Jan Edwards 2017

Cracking the problem of removing a dead almond tree

When do you give up on an old Mallorcan almond tree? We have a few on our finca and they’re past their prime. In spite of that, they are covered in beautiful blossom in the early weeks of each year and offer a reasonable crop of almonds in the autumn. They may be old, but we love them, so they can live out their years in rural Mallorca without fear of a chainsaw massacre.

Mallorcan almond blossom

Blooming lovely!

Sadly, two of our old almond trees were badly damaged in September 2014, when a mini-tornado cut a swathe right through our field. We removed the broken branches then and left the trunks in the hope that there would be some regrowth.

Three years on there was no sign of any life remaining in these two trees. One is set within a stone wall, so must stay (or the wall will tumble down). The other has stood in the middle of the field looking rather forlorn – but removing it would require more than a bit of brute human force. We were pondering this very challenge just the other day, having coffee in the field, while The Boss supervised yet another bonfire. (Fire. It’s a man thing).

I’ll say this for The Boss: he gets things done. I was sitting writing at my computer – my back to the French doors facing the field – when I heard a loud unfamiliar noise. I turned around and our neighbour Lorenzo was in the field on his tractor, pushing the old tree trunk over. He’d been trundling up the lane and stopped for a chat; The Boss asked if he’d be able to pop in sometime to remove the tree (we’ve paid him to do tractor-related jobs before) and Lorenzo said he’d do it there and then. It took just moments to do.Almond tree felled

Down…and destined for the log store

Fungi on an old tree

The tree was dead but the fungus wasn’t!

It is a truth universally acknowledged that any man in possession of a large field must be in want of a tractor – or a kindly neighbour with one. Thanks, Lorenzo (and Jane Austen).

©Jan Edwards 2017