Sourcing a solar-powered water feature for our finca in rural Mallorca

This time last year I was on a mission: I wanted a water feature for our finca’s dining terrace. And I wanted it to be solar-powered, like our electricity supply. Surely that wouldn’t be hard to find?

The Boss and I scoured Mallorca to find one: we really like to buy local if we can. We were amazed that, on an island where the sun shows its face on some 300 days a year, it appeared that we were as likely to find a solar-powered water feature for sale as we were an igloo. After failing to find a supplier in Spain, via the Internet, we gave up.

A few weeks ago I was searching the Internet for something else for the garden that we couldn’t find locally. Lo and behold, I found a site for a company on the Spanish mainland offering a choice of solar-powered water features. Result!

From the mainland to Mallorca

We wasted no time choosing and ordering something to add that sound of trickling water that should make us feel cooler during the balmy summer evenings – most of which are spent on the terrace. The fountain arrived pretty quickly and was easily assembled. I say easily, because The Boss did it. Putting together something like a solar-powered water feature comes under the heading of ‘technical’ in my book. And I don’t do technical. At least, not if I have The Boss handy at the time.

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We love it. And so do our cats, who consider it yet another source of water for them around the finca . . .

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Making new friends in rural Mallorca

Making new friends when you move to another country can take time – especially if you choose to live in a rural location, as we did, on the island of Mallorca. But it didn’t take us long to become on nodding terms with the sheep living in the field across the lane . . .

Fortunately, my writing work has taken me all over the island over the past 11 years and I’ve met lots of people of all nationalities – some of whom have become our friends.

An adventure beckons

Recently I was contacted by a reader of this blog, who had previously commented on a few posts and emailed me for some advice about flying pets over to Mallorca. British woman Celia and her husband are soon to embark on a similar adventure to our own – but, we hope, without some of the traumas we experienced.

On one of their visits to Mallorca, in connection with the property they have bought, Celia and hubby stayed at a boutique hotel I’ve written about a few times on my other blog http://www.eatdrinksleepmallorca.com. They had a great time at Petit Hotel Son Arnau, which is run by a really lovely couple called Alex and Susan – who gave up good London careers to open their own hotel in the village of Selva, near the UNESCO World Heritage Site Tramuntana mountains. We stayed there for a night last summer and have since become friends with this welcoming couple.

Alex and Susan run Mallorca's Petit Hotel Son Arnau.

Alex and Susan – the friendly hosts at Petit Hotel Son Arnau in Selva.

On their most recent visit to Mallorca, Celia and Gordon stayed in the home of their friend in the southwest of the island, but wanted to revisit Petit Hotel Son Arnau to see Alex and Susan again and  have one of Alex’s delicious dinners there. And they invited us along too!

Like old friends

Meeting people for the first time can sometimes be awkward, but we immediately hit it off with this enthusiastic and animal-loving couple, who are going through some of the processes and emotions we went through after we’d bought our finca. They will be visiting Mallorca again in June, and we look forward to seeing them back.

So if you’re moving abroad and are concerned about being able to make friends in your new country, remember the words attributed to the Irish poet William Butler Yeats: “There are no strangers here; only friends you haven’t yet met.”

Summer heat in spring on Mallorca

Boats in Porto Cristo at sunset.

Porto Cristo sunset on May 11, 2015.

Spring on rural Mallorca this year has rapidly become summer. We’re reminded that it’s actually still only spring by the singing of the nightingales in the valley throughout the night. Spain – including the Balearic Islands – is experiencing temperatures more common in July and, on the Spanish mainland, it’s set to sizzle up to 40 degrees Celsius by Thursday – when temperatures will be around 15 degrees higher than average for the time of year. Phew.

Although holidaymakers may be loving the hotter-than-average May temperatures, the early heat has had a detrimental effect on our house-and-garden maintenance schedule. It’s too hot to paint the shutters, or do some repairs involving cementing.

Fortunately, between our last visitors and the next ones – my dad and his younger brother, arriving on Thursday – The Boss had time to bushwhack the field. The wild flowers this year were superb, so we left them in all their glory until the heat zapped the last bit of life from them. Then it was time for The Boss to don his safety gear, fire up his bushwhacker, and get to work.

While clearing the field of the long wild grasses he’d cut down, The Boss found a nest of partridge eggs. The parents had not chosen a good location – on the ground at the base of an almond tree – and had subsequently abandoned the nest, which contained 15 cold eggs.

Abandoned ground nest of partridge eggs.

No countryside for young partridges: a nest of abandoned eggs.

We guessed the partridge parents-to-be were probably last year’s young, with little idea about choosing a great place to raise their kids. Although it was sad to see the eggs left behind, it was probably as well, given that we have seven cats that spend a lot of time in that field!

Perhaps Mr and Mrs Partridge knew what they were doing after all . . .

A flower festival in rural Mallorca

Display in Costitx flower festival

Costitx en Flor 2015

Last Friday we fell a tiny bit in love with a small village called Costitx, in the centre of Mallorca. Relatively few visitors to the island will have heard of it, let alone visited, but many will have flown over it – the village being under one of the flight paths across Mallorca. An impressive number of visitors – mainly Mallorcans – flooded into the village on May 1st for ‘Costitx en Flor’.

Rural Mallorca from near Costitx.

Beautiful views across Mallorca’s Pla to the mountains.

We reached Costitx via a (usually) quiet country lane off the main Manacor to Inca road (between Sineu and Inca) in an area of the island known as the Pla. There’s lovely surrounding countryside and views of the UNESCO World Heritage Serra de Tramuntana. The village itself has some interesting old architecture and several beautifully restored stone townhouses. If we had to live in a village, rather than open countryside, Costitx does have its attractions . . .

The village also has a few claims to fame – and not the sort of fame associated with the likes of Magaluf, or the more genteel mountain village of Deià.

Here are a few facts you could drop into a conversation about this lesser-known part of Mallorca:

Eyes to the skies 

Costitx is home to the Observatori Astronòmic de Mallorca, opened in 1991.  Even after we’d bought our finca – but before we moved to Mallorca – we weren’t aware of its existence. I found out about it only during a BBC radio interview I did with an astronomy expert in north Oxfordshire, who told me the observatory was “very important”. The Observatory is also home to the Mallorca Planetarium.

Prehistoric treasures 

Costitx is home to three prehistoric bronze bulls’ heads found on common land in 1894. Well preserved, and part of the Balearics’ remarkable Talayotic remains, they have their 21st-century home in the Son Corró Sanctuary. One of the streets in the village is named after these Caps de Bou de Costitx.

Political heritage

In 1987, Costitx elected a mayor who became both famous and infamous. Every Mallorcan – and many non-Mallorcan island residents – will know of Maria Antònia Munar . . .

Blooming fab!

Costitx flower festival in May.

Saying it with flowers: a welcome to ‘Costitx en Flor’.

But it was last Friday’s ‘Costitx en Flor’ that wowed us. This annual flower festival sees the whole village decorated with flowers, with each street having its own themed display.

The creativity of the villagers, and hard work involved in putting this event together, are evidence of a real community spirit. We loved it and, if you’re on Mallorca next May 1st, it’s worth a visit if you appreciate flowers, handicrafts, and creativity.

Old denim jeans as flower receptacles

The street with the recycled jeans . . .

Bikes used to display flowers

The street with the bicycle and flower displays . . .

Jeans to display flowers

Jean genius.

Alternative use for an old pneumatic tyre.

Old tyres given a new lease of life.

Costitx en Flor

Streets closed to traffic – and open to floral displays.

Costitx en Flor 2015

Take a seat . . . and add flowers.

Alternative use for an old tyre.

Once a tyre . . . now a chicken.

Costitx house doorway.

In the doorway of an old townhouse in Costitx.

Old Mallorcan well outside house in Costitx.

Old well outside a Costitx house – complete with flowers in a recycled tyre.

Embroidered flowers in Costitx.

Embroidery on a big scale!

Old stone arch in Costitx.

Archway to ‘cup and saucer alley’ in Costitx.

Costitx flower festival May 1st

Anyone for a cuppa?

Costitx church.

Costitx church goes floral.

Garden plants for sale on Mallorca.

Plants for sale – for those inspired by their visit to ‘Costitx en Flor’.